ohzeitgeist
violentcharity:

paulistpress:

Let us not tire of preaching love;  it is the force that will overcome the world.  Let us not tire of preaching love.  Though we see that waves of violence succeed in drowning the fire of Christian love,  love must win out; it is the only thing that can,  We have never preached violence, except the violence of love,  which left Christ nailed to a cross,  the violence that we must each do to ourselves  to overcome our selfishness and such cruel inequalities among us.  The violence we preach is not the violence of the sword,  the violence of hatred.  It is the violence of love,  of brotherhood,  the violence that wills to beat weapons  into sickles for work.” Archbishop Oscar Romero

violentcharity:

paulistpress:

Let us not tire of preaching love;
it is the force that will overcome the world.
Let us not tire of preaching love.
Though we see that waves of violence
succeed in drowning the fire of Christian love,
love must win out; it is the only thing that can,

We have never preached violence,
except the violence of love,
which left Christ nailed to a cross,
the violence that we must each do to ourselves
to overcome our selfishness
and such cruel inequalities among us.
The violence we preach is not the violence of the sword,
the violence of hatred.
It is the violence of love,
of brotherhood,
the violence that wills to beat weapons
into sickles for work.”

Archbishop Oscar Romero

when I was with my mom yesterday, i was reminding her of my great love of bees. She told me about this house two blocks away from my parents’ that had a honeybee infestation and over 50 lbs of honey had to be removed from the house and it still drips honey. 

I swear Texas cannot be normal and have just bee infestations in cars, but no, there’s an actual house that drips honey. 

no one lives there; the bees came when the owners moved overseas and couldn’t find someone to live in it. 

thatgreenevening
There were a few attempts by working-class and young lesbians in the 1950s and ’60s to build institutions other than the gay bars. The most notable was the softball team. During those years many lesbians formed teams or made up the audiences for teams all over the country. Women’s softball leagues usually had at least one or two teams that were all lesbian, and most of the other predominately heterosexual teams had a fair sprinkling of lesbians. The games did succeed in providing legends and heroes for the lesbian subcultures, as well as offering both participants and viewers some possibility for making lesbian contacts outside of the bars. However, as a Californian woman recalls of her softball playing days, ‘We had no place to go after the games but the bars.’ The bars were often even the team sponsors, providing uniforms and travel money. And it was ‘an unwritten law,’ according to a Nebraska woman who played during the ’50s, that after the game you patronized the bar that sponsored you. Young and working-class lesbians who had no homes where they could entertain and were welcome nowhere else socially were held in thrall by the bars, which became their major resort, despite attempts to escape such as the formation of athletic teams.

Lillian Faderman, Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America

i found it interesting that we’ve been trying to get away from the bars-only life from the very beginning. :/ in my softball league, we’re still often sponsored by bars, end up at bars, or have alcohol there at the park.

(via partysoft)

lezwitch

asylum-art:

Andrea Kowch

It’s difficult to believe that artist Andrea Kowch is still in her twenties. Her paintings reverberate with the primal energy of American masters Edward Hopper and Andrew Wyeth and astonish with their unique, mythic beauty. Kowch’s body of work to date is a remarkably large one, encompassing many paintings and drawings. What’s not surprising about this high-art wunderkind is the wealth of awards and accolades that she has received.

Atop the list is a National Visual Arts Award that Kowch was granted from the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts (now the National YoungArts Foundation) in 2005, an honor that ranks recipients in the top 2 percent of American talent.

Kowch is one of a select group of artists shown at the Richard J. Demato Fine Arts Gallery in Sag Harbor and she is represented exclusively by Demato. Kowch’s Dan’s Papers cover painting “Light Keepers” is currently on view at the gallery and, though the original sold some time ago, prints of the work will soon be available for purchase. Kowch will likely show another of her works at the gallery’s late May exhibition, Transcendental Feminine Fantasy, and she will certainly be showcased at ArtHamptons—where her work has consistently sold out—in July.

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